Hall Conservation Ltd


David and Goliath, Lord and Lady Hastings, Seaton Delaval Hall, Tyne and Wear

Metal theft is a widely reported problem, and with cultural items it means the complete loss of part of our cultural heritage; it is not, however, a new problem. David had been ripped from his position on Goliath, when recovered he had been cut into small sections and flattened. All o
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A Case for an Angel, Antony Gormley, Private owner

Antony Gormley’s piece, ‘Case for an Angel’ had been stored for several years in a timber case, and organic acids given off by the wood had caused lead acetate corrosion. In places, the corrosion pitting had penetrated the thin lead skin of the sculpture. The sculpture was to be inclu
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African Slave, Jan Van Nost, private owner

The 18th century lead sculpture of and African slave holds aloft a Delander sundial. The weight of the sundial in addition to the failing armature had caused the figure to slump and distort. Panels were cut into the figure to allow access to the failed armature, this was removed along
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Fame Riding Pegasus, Powis Castle, Welshpool

By the 1980s, the 18c lead sculpture of Fame Riding Pegasus by Andries Charpentier was in an advanced state of collapse. The body of Pegasus had split and a lead strip had been soldered in to close the gap, the support under the belly was a crude replacement of the original and Fame w
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Contemporary Sculpture, University of Warwick

During the mid-1990s while sub-contracting for Plowden & Smith, work was undertaken on the contemporary works located at the University of Warwick. The work involved general maintenance and specific repairs due to damage through general wear and tear, accident, and on occasion van
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Nymph and Fawn, Charles Hodge Mackie, National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh

The Nymph and Fawn sculpture is possibly the only sculpture attributable to Mackie, as he was primarily a painter. It was commissioned as a garden sculpture by John James Cowan in 1914 and cast in lead. Over the course of time and exposed to the elements, the armature had failed, caus
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Russian Sculpture, Dorich House Museum

All of the horses were fixed to the base at one point only, leaving them very vulnerable to breakage. One horse had broken off, and during treatment it was clear that this had been repaired on a number of previous occasions. All of the previous repairs had to be removed in order to fi
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Swimming Lessons, Carol Peace, Private owner

Made from an iron powder/resin compound, the small sculpture, ‘Swimming Lessons’ depicts a man and woman dressed ready to go for a swimming lesson. It had been dropped, resulting in numerous cracks and losses to the resin, the worst of which can be seen on the ankles of the female fig
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Charles II, Grinling Gibbons, Parliament Square, Edinburgh

The lead sculpture of Charles II on horseback, located in Edinburgh’s Parliament Square, is the UK’s oldest lead equestrian sculpture. It was installed on the 16th April 1685, its design is attributed to Grinling Gibbons and it is a second version of the original bronze at Windsor Cas
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Trophy Gates Unicorn, Grinling Gibbons, Hampton Court Palace

The trophy gates group of sculpture, a lion and a unicorn, each holding and armourial cartouche, are contemporary with Sir Christopher Wrens remodelling of the palace. They were erected in July and November of 1701, designed by Grinling Gibbons, then cast and embossed by John Oliver,
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